How Many Syrians? #4

How Many Syrians? #4

steel, nylon, plastic, paint 1 x 3 x 3 feet 2016 This work is from a series of six sculptures interrogating the horror imposed on Syrians electing to leave their war-torn country. It investigates the irony of inoperable life vests made of sponge and tenting material. Fourth in the series, it was proposed and accepted to be included in the weekend-long de Young Museum show, the 20th Annual New Generations Student Showcase titled, Sanctuary, in April 2016.

Binary (detail)

Binary (detail)

pedestal, epoxy clay, glass beads, wood 4 x 1 x 1 feet 2016 This is an experimentation of triumph by perceived subcultures over perceived dominant culture. The overridden entity deteriorates over a construct which is assumed to be true, clinging to the fiction of empty supremacy.

Binary

Binary

pedestal, epoxy clay, glass beads, wood 4 x 1 x 1 feet 2016 This is an experimentation of triumph by perceived subcultures over perceived dominant culture. The overridden entity deteriorates over a construct which is assumed to be true, clinging to the fiction of empty supremacy.

Easter in Lahore

Easter in Lahore

epoxy clay, plaster, foam, found fencing, glass beads 1 x 6 x 4 feet 2016 On 27 March 2016, Easter Sunday, at least 75 people were killed and over 340 injured in a suicide bombing that hit the main entrance of Gulshan-e-Iqbal Park. The attack targeted Christians celebrating Easter. The majority of victims were women and children. Like the scenes of other bombing attacks, media images showed the strewn bodies in Lahore obscured by white cloths.

Easter in Lahore (detail)

Easter in Lahore (detail)

epoxy clay, plaster, foam, found fencing, glass beads 1 x 6 x 4 feet 2016 On 27 March 2016, Easter Sunday, at least 75 people were killed and over 340 injured in a suicide bombing that hit the main entrance of Gulshan-e-Iqbal Park. The attack targeted Christians celebrating Easter. The majority of victims were women and children. Like the scenes of other bombing attacks, media images showed the strewn bodies in Lahore obscured by white cloths.

Rachel Carson

Rachel Carson

silicon bronze 18 x 10 x 11 inches 2016 This piece was created in response to the newly named Rachel Carson College, formerly College Eight. Provost Ronnie Lipschutz is accepting the work on behalf of the college. Plans are being made for permanent installation as well as a dedication at the end of April 2017 during Alumni Weekend. Rachel Carson published the 1962 book Silent Spring whereby initiating the contemporary environmental movement.

Bolshoi Cosmological Simulation

Bolshoi Cosmological Simulation

steel, glass beads, nylon 1 x 2 x 1 feet 2016 This maquette is resultant of collaborative work with UCSC Distinguished Professor of Astrophysics Emeritus, Joel Primack. It is a plan for an indoor walk-through installation subsuming the viewer into a scaled cosmos—galaxies in dark matter form filaments, nodes, walls, and vast chambers. The project is one result of a Summer 2016 internship and independent study undertaken at the Lick Observatory Labs.

Bolshoi Cosmological Simulation (det

Bolshoi Cosmological Simulation (det

steel, glass beads, nylon 1 x 2 x 1 feet 2016 This maquette is resultant of collaborative work with UCSC Distinguished Professor of Astrophysics Emeritus, Joel Primack. It is a plan for an indoor walk-through installation subsuming the viewer into a scaled cosmos—galaxies in dark matter form filaments, nodes, walls, and vast chambers. The project is one result of a Summer 2016 internship and independent study undertaken at the Lick Observatory Labs.

How Many Syrians? #1

How Many Syrians? #1

wood, paper, cotton, redacted text 10 x 5 x 3 feet 2015 The appearance of drowned toddler Aylan Kurdi on a Turkey shore briefly galvanized the world’s attention to the plight of immigrating Syrians. His brother and mother drowned that day and all were survived by his father, Abdullah Kurdi, who said in a CNN interview: Is there anyone whose children are not valuable to them? The children enrapture you. They wake up, Daddy, Daddy, I want to play in the water. Everything is gone.

Home

Home

antique chair on silk rug on paper, glass and crystal beads on steel 10 x 9 x 9 feet 2015 This piece is an exploration into and mourning of loss of self as imposed by law and evolution. My anguish, ever present in life lost while nursing is exposed. The weight of a tiny form imprisoned me in this chair for two and a half years behind psychologically aggressive, inescapable bars of affection and burden.

14 How Many Syrians #5 1

14 How Many Syrians #5 1

How Many Syrians? #5 wood, epoxy clay, glass beads, plastic 4 x 12 x 12 inches 2016 Materials narrate a grave situation—one where thousands of old and young alike die at sea even as they attempt escape from violence and death in their homeland. In early September 2015 the body of toddler Aylan Kurdi washed up on a Bodrum, Turkey beach. The picturesque photo of a child appearing to nap in the wet sand, wearing a bright red t-shirt and jean shorts briefly captured the world’s attention.

Sunset Bubbles #3

Sunset Bubbles #3

100 gallons of handmade bubble juice, 100 handmade wands and buckets, 100+ people 2016 Evaporating soap films and the end of a day offer insight to the finiteness of life—as 16th century vanitas painters did—in this third in a series of five happenings. Physical manifestations of the brevity and beauty of life are persistently generated and participants are encouraged to allow them to dissipate naturally, rather them bring them to a premature end.

Here and There

Here and There

charcoal, wood, landscape 2016 Two fields of residual burned material exemplify the connectedness of humans on earth in disparate locations. Where a localized environmental devastation creates misery in one area of the the world, effects are echoed in sites unseen, though ostensibly unconnected.

Here and There (detail)

Here and There (detail)

charcoal, wood, landscape 2016 Two fields of residual burned material exemplify the connectedness of humans on earth in disparate locations. Where a localized environmental devastation creates misery in one area of the the world, effects are echoed in sites unseen, though ostensibly unconnected.

Bursting at the Dreams

Bursting at the Dreams

glass beads, brass, silver, US currency 12 x 10 x 2 inches 2011 This is a visual quagmire of undulating tendrils which underscores the morass homeowners found for themselves in the housing bubble. It was a collaboration with glass beadmaker Patty Lakinsmith. This piece is representative of a series of large, marginally wearable beadwork executed over 10 years. Specific intention is exemplified through the use of tiny glass beads.